From The Big Issue Australia, March 2014.

From The Big Issue Australia, March 2014.

From The Age, 10th April 2014.This was inspired by two suits who managed to clear the whole back half of my regular morning cafe with their loud Gordon-Geckoing a couple of weeks ago. I stubbornly held my stool for ten minutes or so, but eventually had to move away too. Opening dialogue when Suit A sat down with Suit B was “Maaate! [opens laptop] Let’s make some money!” I jotted this idea down before evacuating the area, so their conversation made ME some money, too. But I dare say less than either of them…

From The Age, 10th April 2014.

This was inspired by two suits who managed to clear the whole back half of my regular morning cafe with their loud Gordon-Geckoing a couple of weeks ago. I stubbornly held my stool for ten minutes or so, but eventually had to move away too. Opening dialogue when Suit A sat down with Suit B was “Maaate! [opens laptop] Let’s make some money!” I jotted this idea down before evacuating the area, so their conversation made ME some money, too. But I dare say less than either of them…

From The Sunday Age, 13th April 2013.I’m fascinated with the language of spin. Cold jargon-heavy language that is used all around us - advertising and politics particularly - to sell and smooth over the bumps of an idea, a situation, a proposal. A decent chunk of my work uses/satirises this language, which is so much a part of our world, and I had dry fun playing with it here…

From The Sunday Age, 13th April 2013.

I’m fascinated with the language of spin. Cold jargon-heavy language that is used all around us - advertising and politics particularly - to sell and smooth over the bumps of an idea, a situation, a proposal. A decent chunk of my work uses/satirises this language, which is so much a part of our world, and I had dry fun playing with it here…

From The Age, 3rd March 2014.

From The Age, 3rd March 2014.

From The Big Issue Australia, March 2014.

From The Big Issue Australia, March 2014.

From The Age, 1st April 2014.

From The Age, 1st April 2014.

From The Age, 25th March 2014.

From The Age, 25th March 2014.

From The Sunday Age, 30th March, 2014.I’m treading in tricky territory for a cartoonist here - the unfunny cartoon. Again a type many do brilliantly, observations instead of big laughs, but my modus operandi has always been to slip my opinion into someone’s brain with a good joke. This use of humour as a sneaky opinion-carrier is, for me, the secret weapon of cartoons, and any good satire really, but this is a different type. In recent national discussions about racism and bigotry, the talk is mainly about more extreme, hurtful racism, but it’s had me thinking about this stuff -  the more subtle biases and generalisations that are woven through our society, there in pretty much all of us. Things that are probably the foundations for racism, if not the racism itself. I’m pretty disturbed by the government’s proposed amendments to the Racial Discrimination Act. Laws indicate the values of a country, and laws that defend the rights of people to be bigoted over the bigotee, are, in my opinion, a worry. While the changes may not create an army of bigots, they do send a message of the sort of country we are, and aspire to be. The right to say what you think is a great freedom, and, god knows, one cartoonists benefit from enormously in this country. It’s one I value very much, but that is, I think, a different thing to unfettered ‘free speech’. I think constraint on speech that is substantially hurtful to others is one ingredient that allows for a civilized society. Ok, back to the jokes now…

From The Sunday Age, 30th March, 2014.

I’m treading in tricky territory for a cartoonist here - the unfunny cartoon. Again a type many do brilliantly, observations instead of big laughs, but my modus operandi has always been to slip my opinion into someone’s brain with a good joke. This use of humour as a sneaky opinion-carrier is, for me, the secret weapon of cartoons, and any good satire really, but this is a different type. In recent national discussions about racism and bigotry, the talk is mainly about more extreme, hurtful racism, but it’s had me thinking about this stuff -  the more subtle biases and generalisations that are woven through our society, there in pretty much all of us. Things that are probably the foundations for racism, if not the racism itself.

I’m pretty disturbed by the government’s proposed amendments to the Racial Discrimination Act. Laws indicate the values of a country, and laws that defend the rights of people to be bigoted over the bigotee, are, in my opinion, a worry. While the changes may not create an army of bigots, they do send a message of the sort of country we are, and aspire to be. The right to say what you think is a great freedom, and, god knows, one cartoonists benefit from enormously in this country. It’s one I value very much, but that is, I think, a different thing to unfettered ‘free speech’. I think constraint on speech that is substantially hurtful to others is one ingredient that allows for a civilized society.

Ok, back to the jokes now…

From The Sunday Age, 23rd March 2014.Eagled-eyed under-5 readers may have noticed that the cartoon’s dog is, in fact, Cranky Frankie, from Mary Ellen Jordan’s and my recent kids’ book ‘Lazy Daisy, Busy Lizzie’ (note the distinctive dismissive glance, and all-round surly, I-hate-you demeanor). Which, I suppose, makes the humans the unseen farmer owners from ‘Lazy Daisy, Busy Lizzie’. Not necessary to appreciate the cartoon. Or LDBL. But there you go.

From The Sunday Age, 23rd March 2014.

Eagled-eyed under-5 readers may have noticed that the cartoon’s dog is, in fact, Cranky Frankie, from Mary Ellen Jordan’s and my recent kids’ book ‘Lazy Daisy, Busy Lizzie’ (note the distinctive dismissive glance, and all-round surly, I-hate-you demeanor). Which, I suppose, makes the humans the unseen farmer owners from ‘Lazy Daisy, Busy Lizzie’. Not necessary to appreciate the cartoon. Or LDBL. But there you go.

From the March in March, Melbourne, yesterday.

From yesterday’s march. Thanks to Freja and Linda, for helping take the message to Tony (see post 11/3), and for the photos.